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20 Best Songs with Baby in the Title

20 Best Songs with Baby in the Title

Baby, you may have heard this word spoken through a plethora of mediums, but we can confidently say that you may have heard it the most through music. The word baby has been used to describe everything from infants to romantic love.

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This is why, for so many years, the word continues to make the rounds through all genres of music. However, only a few select can be placed at the very top; therefore, the following list includes the top songs with baby in the title. Note that the list is in no particular order.

Songs with Baby in the Title

“Baby I’m a Star” – Prince and the Revolution

In true Prince fashion, “Baby I’m a Star” is less about the lover he addresses in the song than it’s about the Purple One’s own confidence in himself. But by 1984, he had earned the right to be a little boastful. Taken from the Purple Rain album and film that catapulted him into mega-stardom, this R&B and rock hybrid summons everything Prince did best. This buoyant, confident rave-up gave his crack band at the time, the Revolution, plenty of momentum when he played it live. It was, in fact, featured in the film’s final scenes, which were recorded on stage in 1983.


“Baby You’re a Rich Man” – The Beatles

The B-side to their 1967 worldwide hippie anthem “All You Need is Love” is surprisingly sardonic. Directed at some unnamed “Beautiful Person,” this Eastern-sounding rocker is yet another of songwriter John Lennon’s sarcastic swipes at the in-crowd. Rumors have persisted for years that it is actually about then-manager Brian Epstein.


“I’ll Be Your Baby Tonight” – Bob Dylan

Folks who were caught surprised by Dylan’s conversion to straight country in 1969 with Nashville Skyline probably overlooked this quiet gem. Released in 1967 on his stripped-down John Wesley Harding album, this soulful mid-tempo love ballad featured some of Bob’s prettier vocals to date. It was a sure signpost of things to come.


“Runaway Baby” – Bruno Mars

From his 2010 debut, “Runaway Baby” served as a calling card for this genre-defying artist. Combining rock, soul and funk, this tune found its way onto many a playlist when released as a single. Over an addictive groove, Mars’ speaker is down for a good time—even as he warns his paramour that he is not in the market for anything serious.


“Dream Baby (How Long Must I Dream)” – Roy Orbison

A 1962 top 10 hit in several countries, this Cindy Walker-penned tune is a gorgeous rockabilly ballad. Orbison may be remembered for his almost operatic singing style, but “Dream Baby” proved that he could also croon with best of them. This song was later covered by Glen Campbell and Waylon Jennings.


“Baby Driver” – Simon and Garfunkel

Another B-side, also found on the duo’s final album Bridge Over Troubled Water, this Paul Simon classic was pitched perfectly to the music scene of 1969. With some moderately double-entendre lyrics, this song chugs along in the vein of Creedence Clearwater Revival. It’s a simple and easy-going tune with a more than a hint of the swagger of 1950s rock-and-roll.


“Love to Love You Baby” – Donna Summers

This early disco classic was Summers’ first major hit in America and helped to break disco, and Summer, as a potent chart presence throughout the late 1970s. Produced with characteristic élan, this sultry number was actually banned in England by BBC radio for its suggestiveness. Nonetheless, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame gave it the honor of listing it in its 500 Songs that Changed Rock and Roll.

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“Baby Now That I Found You” – The Foundations

As the debut single for soul band the Foundations, this heartbreak classic owes more than a little to the Motown Sound, although it more than stands up on its own. With Clem Curtis’ soaring vocal and a bright production, this was an English smash, and hovered just outside the American Top Ten. It remains an oldies radio staple. And a good tune remains a good tune, no matter how its covered. In 1997, country artist Allison Krauss released a very different—but equally memorable—acoustic version.


“You’re Just a Baby” – Belle and Sebastian

Scottish indie popsters Belle and Sebastian enjoy a considerable cult success to this day. This tune, off their 1996 debut, is awash in the 1960s-inspired folk-pop that they would become renowned for. It’s a little hard to figure out who the speaker is addressing here—a friend? A lover? Focus instead on the infectious production and melodies. Speaking of, its staccato opening riff slyly quotes an unlikely source: the 1971 progressive rock classic “Yours is No Disgrace” by Yes.


“Run Baby Run” – Toro y Moi

Singer-songwriter Chaz Bundick, who records as Toro Y Moi, is a contemporary artist known for his eclectic influences. Originally labelled as “chillwave,” a retro-sounding pop that often draws on the music of the 1960s and 1980s, Toro y Moi have covered further ground with each release. “Run Baby Run” was the first single from Bundick’s fourth album What For? Released in 2015, listeners detected more than a hint of classic Beach Boys in its melodies and harmonies. The speaker may well be singing to his lover, their infant, or both. It’s a charming song that builds and builds—and then over all too soon.


“Be My Baby”—The Ronettes (1963)

Ah, the age of innocent, kind of. Well, it certainly did sound like it when “Be my baby” by the Ronettes debuted in 1963. However, they have not received the best of notoriety throughout the years due to backstage issues.

The band has certainly made its mark in history. The song was produced by Phil Spector, who at the time built a reputation as someone who could build a wall of sound.

The song was so popular and so well crafted that Beach Boy’s Brian Wilson even called it the best pop song of all time and was even recorded as saying that he had listened to the song well over a hundred times.


“Dont Worry Baby” -The Beach Boys

As stated above, the song “Be my baby” was very much beloved by Brian Wilson that he would go on to create a male version of the song for the Beach Boys.

Very much like the original, “Don’t Worry Baby” would use some of the simple elements that made the original so great. Although the song was a hit, Brian Wilson quickly went back to producing music that was more aligned to his creative mind.


“Since I Lost My Baby”—The Temptations

If there was ever a great example of the sounds of Motown, it’s this song by the Temptations. The song written by Smokey Robinson and Pete Moore of the Miracles was an instant hit and would reach the top 20 charts within the R & B & pop charts. The single would be released during the summer of 1965.

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“Baby, I Love Your Way” – Peter Frampton

There’s no doubt about it; the 1970s were all about going on the dance floor and getting your groove on. However, even then, you still had singers such as Peter Frampton bringing us incredible love songs. The song is catchy as it is irresistible to dance to.

Peter Frampton would re-debuted the song within his live album “Frampton Comes Alive.” The song did very well on the charts and would re-emerge in the early ’90s when Big Mountain would go on to cover the song. Even today, the song has been used constantly throughout commercials, television shows, and movies.


“Give It To Me, Baby” – Rick James

A true innovator, Rick James not only presented the world with incredible music but also introduced a new sub-genre called punk-funk. Rick James would hit the mainstream when he introduced his late 80’s Motown album “Street Songs.”

One of the songs included within that album was “Give it to me Baby.” Although the album included another major hit, “Super Freak,” it was “give it to me baby” that would not only reach the Billboard Hot 100 Chart but also become a staple of many dance clubs during that time.


“Baby, Baby, Baby” – TLC

At first glance, you may not think that these baggy pants, eyewear accessories ladies could present the world with one of the most romantic songs, but that’s exactly what they did over 20 years ago.

The song, which was inspired by true events, speaks about a man who doesn’t think they have to work for their girlfriend’s love. The song is not only upbeat and catchy but tells an amazing story of taking love for granted.


Baby One More Time” – Britney Spears

Baby one more time was not only Britney Spears’ debut song but also the turning point of the 90’s culture. The song, which was originally created for TLC, was produced by Max Martin and Martin, Denniz Pop, and Rami Yacoub.

The song was quickly offered to Britney Spears, who at the time was not happy with the music being presented to her. However, this one was different, and she quickly fell in love with it. Along with the video, the “baby one more time” quickly rose to the top of the charts and into the heart of American pop culture for years to come.


“Baby” – Justin Beiber

Perhaps the biggest pop star to come out of the early 2010s, Justine Beiber struck gold with his debut song simply titled “Baby.” The young Canadian was first discovered by Justin Timberlake and Usher when he began to post videos of himself singing on youtube.

Needless to say, his stint on Youtube didn’t last too long as he quickly rose to fame with “Baby” being the perfect launching pad for his career.


“Baby” – Ashanti

Although her music career wasn’t too long, the time she did spend putting out music provided us with an incredible amount of musical content that we still enjoy today.

Perhaps one of her more popular songs, and in fact, one of her last included “baby.” the song, which was released on November 17, 2002, was written by Irving Lorenzo, Mike Dean, Andre Parker, and Brad Jordan.


“Ice Ice Baby” – Vanilla Ice

Vanilla Ice broke into the mainstream with his hit “Ice Ice Baby” in 1989. Although surrounded by controversy due to the similarity to the “Under Pressure” song by Queen, the song would become one of the most played hits within clubs, homes, and radio stations.

The song, according to Vanilla Ice, is his account of a crazy weekend he spent with his friend Shay.